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TGR, Gutenberg, Rubric

March 2015

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TGR, Gutenberg, Rubric

From Twitter 12-12-2010


  • 00:52:09: Rewrite and edit. "The Volunteer." pages edited: 69/122, Total words added: 1369. #amwriting
  • 21:47:03: Edit "The Volunteer" and adding things I didn't know I left out during #nanowrimo. Pages edited: 35/126 (60%). Words added: 2890. #amwriting

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Comments

Progress

Sounds like you're really doing great!

Would you believe, I left out CONFLICT? I have a situation with 19 hostages/kidnap victims locked in a large, totally dark room. There's some initial squabbling, then they all start rowing in the same direction to solve a problem (how to escape).

Is that very realistic? Or would people be unable to overcome their normal natures?

Edited at 2010-12-13 09:49 pm (UTC)

Re: Progress

It's good to see you are also making progress!

RE: Conflict.
I recently came across an interesting book called "The Relationship Cure." It describes seven different personality types or emotional command systems that you will encounter in nearly any group (and to some extent in every character): CEO, Explorer, Nester, Sensualist, Sentry, Jester, and Energy Czar. These people may all have a common goal (how to escape) and even agree on some of the basics, but the very nature of their characters will distract them and create conflict--perhaps not about the goal, but other things. For example, the sensualist might be constantly maneouvering to get close to the pretty girl while everytime a suggestion is made the jester cracks wise about it. Just when everyone is about to make the break, everything might come to a halt because the explorer has taken a different path and the sentry wants everyone to go look for her.

Basically, what I'm saying is that conflict doesn't necessarily have to come from a difference in goal or in the plan, but actually comes from how they interact with each other.

Helpful?

Re: Progress

"The Relationship Cure" by John M. Gottman, PhD.

Purchased

I bought a copy on half.com, and have received a notice that it has now been shipped. Thanks again.

Re: Progress

Yes. Very interesting. Thanks for the ideas and the book title. I can see several of my characters among those types very clearly.